Chickens as Pets

A chicken is a very sociable pet. With the right planning, one can keep several chicken with minimum supervision and/ or attention.
If you are thinking of keeping a chicken as a house pet,there are a few  thing’s you need to consider first. Most Importantly is Potty training See:http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=125001 for a guide to potty training your chicken. You will also need to consider the gender of your house bird, for pets sake you should never mix two sexes of chickens. A rooster should be kept as a solitary house pet, and will get  hormonally in-balanced if hen’s or other bird’s are around. Whereas you can keep a few hens. and not have as big of a problem.But remember rooster’s are apt to crow but hens are ASSURED to sing the egg song!lol Also consider if there are other pet’s in the house, make sure that they are chicken compatible.

Sourced from:http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/125038/chickens-as-house-pets-a-guide
The environment for chicken kept as pets has to be just right. It would include:
Housing
Warm, dry and well-ventilated.
The house and everything inside should be cleaned frequently and disinfected to remove parasites.
Food and water should be provided in the house.
Flooring
Covered with dry material (e.g. wood shavings or straw), to allow foraging and dustbathing (particularly important when it’s wet outside). This must be topped-up or replaced when needed.
Space
Enough for chickens to exercise, stretch their wings and carry out normal behaviours.
As a guide, roughly 12 square metres should be enough for 30 birds. Although this depends on the size and numbers of chickens and layout of facilities.
Perches
Should be around 3 to 5 centimetres wide with rounded edges and height should suit the size of the birds.
Should provide enough space for all chickens to comfortably roost at the same time (from 15 centimetres per chicken), and enough space between perches to let them get up and down without injury.
Nest boxes
Egg laying hens need quiet, enclosed nest boxes.
Should be draught-free and lined with clean, dry, comfortable nesting material (e.g. straw or wood shavings).
Entrance to the house/outdoor area
Should allow chickens to pass through easily without having to crouch.
More than one entrance helps avoid bullying and encourages use of the outdoor area.

Sourced from:http://www.rspca.org.uk/adviceandwelfare/farm/farmanimals/chickens/environment

If your carpentry skills are upto par, with the right coop building plans you should be good to go at a cheaper cost.